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Piston Beechcraft Accidents 6/9/2022 – 6/22/2022

Official information from FAA and NTSB sources (unless otherwise noted). Editorial comments (contained in parentheses), year-to-date summary and closing comments are those of the author.  All information is preliminary and subject to change.  Comments are meant solely to enhance flying safety.  Please use these reports to help you more accurately evaluate the potential risks when you make your own decisions about how and when to fly.

©2022 Mastery Flight Training, Inc.  All Rights Reserved

 

THE WEEKLY ACCIDENT UPDATE IS AN INDEPENDENT PRODUCT OF MASTERY FLIGHT TRAINING, INC.

 

New reports this week

6/8 1741Z (1241 local Wednesday afternoon): A Be58 “diverted and landed after 3/4 of the propeller separated from the left engine in flight,” recovering at Evansville, Indiana. None of the five aboard the Baron was hurt, and airplane damage is “unknown.” N78KL (TH-1578) is a 1990 Baron 58 registered in Paragould, Arkansas.

 

(“Propeller separation in flight”–Flightaware shows the flight was en route from Arkansas to Ohio when the emergency occurred).

 

6/12 1400Z (0900 local Sunday morning): A Be35 “landed short of the runway due to engine issues,” at Picayune, Mississippi. The pilot, alone in the airplane, was not hurt. Airplane damage is “minor”. N300Q (D-2008) is a 1949 A35 registered in Deerfield, New Hampshire.

 

(“Engine failure on approach/landing”)

 

6/12 1540Z (1140 local Sunday morning): The nose wheel of tricycle-gear Be18 separated from the airplane during takeoff from Stuart, Florida. The two aboard the Twin Beech were unhurt in the landing that followed, and airplane damage was “minor”. N30GB (BA-688) is a 1964 H18 registered in Las Vegas, Nevada.

 

(“Nosewheel separation during takeoff”)

 

6/12 2100Z (1700 local Sunday afternoon): A Be23 “struck a deer on takeoff, damaging [the] propeller, engine cowling and nose gear,” at Charlotte, Michigan. The solo pilot is unhurt and the extend of airplane damage is “unknown”. N5671S (MB-110) is a 1966 23-19 Sport registered in Eaton Rapids, Michigan.

 

(“Struck animal during takeoff”)

 

6/17 2319Z (1819 local Friday evening): A Be36 “experienced a power loss and landed on a gravel road” at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. The solo pilot was not injured and airplane damage is “unknown”. N17794 (E-1029) is a 1977 A36 registered in Fort Dodge, Iowa.

(“Engine failure in flight”–according to FlightAware the Bonanza’s off-airport landing occurred during a flight from Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri, to Iowa City, Iowa, which is not far from Cedar Rapids. A little over an hour later it reappeared on radar for a short flight from the forced landing site to Iowa City. Four days later it made an apparently routine flight to home base in Fort Dodge. The implication is that the airplane ran out of fuel, either obtained fuel or switched fuel tanks and took off from the road, and then resumed normal operation…unless some other minor repair was effected in the hour the airplane was on that gravel road.)

 

6/18 1355Z (0655 local Saturday morning): A Be35 “crashed while on approach” during an instructional flight at Buckeye, Arizona. “Fire engulfed the aircraft” after impact, killing the pilot and flight instructor. N13AR (D-3885) was a 1954 E35 registered in Peoria, Arizona.

 

(“Crash on approach/landing”; “Fatal”; “Airplane destroyed”–the pilot receiving instruction died at the scene.The flight instructor was taken to a local hospital and died a few hours later, according to local reports).

 

6/19 1300Z (0600 local Sunday morning): A Be60 “lost a prop on climb out” from Chandler, Arizona. The pilot and passenger were unhurt in the otherwise uneventful single-engine landing, and total damage is “unknown”. N80JS (P-512) is a 1979 B60 Duke registered in Valdosta, Georgia.

 

(“Propeller separation in flight”–the second one this report)

 

6/19 1535Z (1035 local Sunday morning): A Be45’s nose gear collapsed during landing at Wichita, Kansas. The pilot, alone in the T-34, was unhurt. Airplane damage is “unknown”. N723MM (serial number 3490) is a 1953 T-34A registered in Wichita.

 

(“Gear collapse during landing”)

 

New NTSB reports this week

Events previously reported in the Weekly Accident Update

 

6/2 fatal Beech Sport takeoff crash at Oroville, California. From the preliminary report:

 

According to a video of the accident flight captured by a witness, who was also a student of the accident pilot, the pilot and passenger completed an engine run-up and subsequently taxied to runway 13. The engine sounded smooth and continuous as the airplane lifted off the runway in about 1,300 ft and transitioned into a climb. Approximately fifteen seconds later the airplane began to descend. The airplane started another climb about four seconds later, which was immediately followed by a right turn. The airplane’s rate of turn began to increase during the turn at which time the video ceased. The witness reported that the airplane impacted the ground seconds after he terminated the video to assist the occupants of the airplane.

 

The witness reported that he flew the accident airplane with the pilot about 2 weeks prior to the accident. After an uneventful preflight inspection and engine run-up they taxied to runway 31 where they began a ground run. They performed two attempted takeoffs and aborted both due to performance issues. According to the witness, the pilot and pilot-rated passenger had planned to fly the airplane on the day of the accident to troubleshoot the performance deficiency.

 

The airplane came to rest in an approximately 40° nose down attitude on a heading of about 097° magnetic, about 500 ft south of the departure end of runway 13. All major components were accounted for at the accident site. The left wing remained attached to the fuselage, and the right wing was partially separated at the wing root. The fuselage frame was deformed about midspan and the tail was canted slightly left of the fuselage. Both the stabilator and rudder remained connected to the empennage at their attachments. The engine remained attached to the engine firewall, which was wrapped around the engine accessory case. Both propeller blades remained attached to the propeller hub, which was still connected to the engine crankshaft.

6/7 fatal Beech Skipper engine failure during a student solo flight at Hemet, California.

Change “Crash/unknown” to “Engine failure during approach/traffic pattern”. From the report:

According to the student pilot’s flight instructor, the pilot was authorized to depart Redlands Municipal Airport (REI), Redlands, California and fly about 22 NM south to Hemet-Ryan Airport (HMT), Hemet. The accident flight was the pilot’s second solo cross-country flight from REI to HMT. A witness that was operating in the HMT traffic pattern reported that he had just departed runway 23 and was making left traffic. The witness was on the upwind leg of the pattern when he heard the accident pilot make a radio call over the Common Traffic Advisory Frequency (CTAF) that stated, “Right downwind for 23, I have no power.” The witness continued to the downwind leg and saw the accident airplane about midfield, over the runway and descending through about 150 ft above ground level (agl). The witness observed the accident airplane flying at an airspeed that he identified as a faster than normal approach speed, as the airplane passed over the departure end of runway 23 about 100 ft AGL. The witness lost sight of the airplane, and shortly after observed a plume of smoke.

According to a second witness that was monitoring the CTAF during their employment shift, reported that the accident airplane made two touch and go landings, and aborted the third landing on runway 23. According to the witness, the airplane did not touch down on the runway and remained about 30 ft agl. Shortly after, a distress call was transmitted over the CTAF stating, “I am declaring an emergency, loss of power.” The witness recalled that the airplane made a left turn and touched down on the soft dirt surface of a plowed vegetation field.

Ground markings in the dirt surface revealed that the airplane bounced twice during the landing roll. The total ground roll distance was about 665 ft and veer right, prior to the airplane crossing a residential roadway. The airplane then collided with a retaining wall located on the east side of the road. The airplane’s engine, cabin, left wing root, and the right wing breached the cinder block retaining wall and sustained thermal damage. The aft fuselage and the empennage did not breach the wall and did not sustain thermal damage.

 

2022 SUMMARY: Reported Beechcraft piston mishaps, 2022:

Total reported: 60 reports

 

Environment:

Operation in VMC:  21 reports
Operation in IMC:     1 report
Weather “unknown” or “not reported”:   39 reports
Operation at night:  4 reports

 

Most Serious Injury

“Serious” injury accidents (not involving fatalities):   2 reports
Fatal accidents:   8 reports

 

Aircraft damage
“Substantial” damage:   7 reports
Aircraft “destroyed”:    7 reports

 

BEECH AERO CLUB Series:  11 reports

 

By Aircraft Type

Be19 Sport   4 reports

Be23 Musketeer/Sundowner  3 reports

Be24 Custom III/Sierra  2 reports

Be76 Duchess    2 reports

Be77 Skipper   1 report

 

Environment:

Operation in VMC:  3 reports
Operation in IMC:    0 reports
Weather “unknown” or “not reported”:  9 reports
Operation at night: 0 reports

 

Most Serious Injury
“Serious” injury accidents (not involving fatalities):  1 report
Fatal accidents:  1 report

 

Aircraft damage

“Substantial” damage:  2 reports
Aircraft “destroyed”:   0 report

 

PRELIMINARY DETERMINATION OF CAUSE

(all subject to update per official findings):

 

FATAL and SERIOUS INJURY EVENTS   2 reports

 

Impact during takeoff   1 report (Be19)

Engine failure during approach/traffic pattern  1 report (Be77)

 

OTHER EVENTS    10 reports

 

Impact during landing   4 reports

Runway overrun   1 report (Be23)

Nose gear collapse/fixed gear   1 report (Be19)

Hard landing  1 report (Be19)

Struck animal during takeoff   1 report (Be19)

 

Landing gear mishaps  3 reports

Gear collapse during landing   3 reports (Be24; two Be76s)

 

Engine failure  1 report

Engine failure in flight   1 report (Be23)

 

Miscellaneous causes

Uncommanded 180 on the ground, striking other airplanes   1 report (Be24)

Taxi into obstacle   1 report (Be23)

 

BONANZA/BARON Series:   42 reports

 

By Aircraft Type

Be35 Bonanza   13 reports

Be36 Bonanza   9 reports
Be58 Baron   10 reports

Be33 Debonair/Bonanza   5 reports

Be55 Baron   5 reports

 

Environment:

Operation in VMC:  15 reports
Operation in IMC:    1 report
Weather “unknown” or “not reported”:  23 reports
Operation at night: 4 reports

 

Most Serious Injury
“Serious” injury accidents (not involving fatalities):  1 report
Fatal accidents:  6 reports

 

Aircraft damage
“Substantial” damage:  5 reports
Aircraft “destroyed”:   7 reports

 

PRELIMINARY DETERMINATION OF CAUSE
(all subject to update per official findings):

 

FATAL and SERIOUS INJURY EVENTS   7 reports

 

Loss of control in flight   2 reports

Loss of control during landing/go-around   1 report (Be35)

Loss of control during maneuvering flight   1 report (Be33)

 

Impact during landing   2 reports

Landed short   1 report. 1 report (Be35)

Crash on approach/landing   1 report (Be35)

 

Impact during takeoff   1 report

Loss of directional control during takeoff   1 report (Be58)

 

Miscellaneous   1 report

Cabin fire in flight   1 report (Be58)

 

Unknown causes

Crash/unknown   1 report (Be58)

Takeoff/unknown   1 report (Be58)

 

OTHER EVENTS    35 reports

 

Landing gear-related mishaps   15 reports

Gear collapse during landing

8 reports (Be33; four Be35s; two Be55s; Be58)

Gear up landing

7 reports (Be33; Be35; three Be36s; two Be55s)

 

Engine failure   6 reports

Engine failure in flight

3 reports (Be33; Be35; Be36)

Engine failure during approach/landing

2 reports (Be35, Be36)

Engine failure during initial climb   1 report (Be33)

Propeller separation in flight   1 report (Be58)

 

Impact during landing  2 reports

Loss of directional control during landing   1 report (Be35)

Loss of directional control during landing/brake failure   1 report (Be36)

 

Miscellaneous/other causes

Taxi into object   3 reports (Be35; two Be58s)

Turbulence encounter/head injury in flight   2 reports (Be35; Be36)

Taxiway excursion/runway excursion during taxi   1 report (Be58)

Forced landing/unknown   1 report (Be35)

Struck animal during landing   1 report (Be58)

Takeoff/unknown   1 report (Be55)

Crash/unknown   1 report (Be35)

 

MISCELLANEOUS Models:  6 reports

Be60 Duke   3 reports

Be18 Twin Beech   2 reports

Be45 (T-34) Mentor   1 report

 

Environment:

Operation in VMC:  2 reports
Operation in IMC:    0 reports
Weather “unknown” or “not reported”:  4 reports
Operation at night: 1 report

 

Most Serious Injury

“Serious” injury accidents (not involving fatalities):  0 reports
Fatal accidents:  0 reports

 

Aircraft damage

“Substantial” damage:  0 reports
Aircraft “destroyed”:   0 reports

 

PRELIMINARY DETERMINATION OF CAUSE

(all subject to update per official findings):

 

FATAL and SERIOUS INJURY EVENTS   0 reports

 

OTHER EVENTS   6 reports

Gear collapse during landing/known mechanical failure   1 report (Be60)

Gear collapse during landing   1 report (Be45)

Taxi into obstacles/other aircraft   1 report (Be60)

Nosewheel separation during takeoff   1 report (Be18)

Loss of directional control during landing   1 report (Be18)

Propeller separation in flight  1 report (Be60)

 

Recognize an N-number?  Want to check on friends or family that may have been involved in a cited mishap?  Click here to find the registered owner.   Please accept my sincere personal condolences if you or anyone you know was involved in a mishap.  I welcome your comments, suggestions and criticisms.

 

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