Beech Weekly Accident Update

Piston Beechcraft Accidents 

1/16/2020 – 1/23/2020

 

Official information from FAA and NTSB sources (unless otherwise noted). Editorial comments (contained in parentheses), year-to-date summary and closing comments are those of the author.  All information is preliminary and subject to change.  Comments are meant solely to enhance flying safety.  Please use these reports to help you more accurately evaluate the potential risks when you make your own decisions about how and when to fly.  © 2020 Mastery Flight Training, Inc.  All Rights Reserved

THE WEEKLY ACCIDENT UPDATE IS AN INDEPENDENT PRODUCT OF

MASTERY FLIGHT TRAINING, INC.

Click here for the
2019 Year-End Report as of January 8, 2020
https://www.mastery-flight-training.com/2019year-end.pdf

 

New reports this week

1/15 2200Z (1600 local Wednesday afternoon): A Be55’s gear collapsed during landing at Abilene, Texas. The two aboard the Baron were unhurt and airplane damage is “minor”. N3WK (TC-557) is a 1963 B55 registered in Floydada, Texas.

(“Gear collapse during landing”)

1/16 1845Z (1245 local Thursday afternoon): A Be76 “ran off the runway under unknown circumstances” during a personal flight at St. Charles, Missouri. Both persons aboard the Duchess escaped injury despite “substantial” airplane damage. N6630D (ME-221) is a 1979 Beech 76 registered in St. Charles.

(“Loss of directional control on the runway”—initial reports do not note the phase of flight, whether takeoff or landing).

1/22 0107Z (1707 local Tuesday afternoon 1/21/2020): Four aboard a Be36 perished when the Bonanza crashed “under unknown circumstances” while attempting takeoff from Corona, California. The airplanes was “destroyed” in a post-crash fire. N36TT (EA-350) was a 1983 B36TC registered in Torrance, California.

(“Failed to reject takeoff/failed to attain climb/runway overrun” [from witness reports]; “Fatal”; “Airplane destroyed”; “VMC”—a local news report includes an eyewitness who appears to know about light airplanes. Video shows that the airplane ran through a low fence off the end of the 3200-foot [975 meter] long, 533 foot [162 meter] elevation runway, then over a small rise before coming to rest inverted and becoming completely destroyed by fire.

Reporters quote local pilots as saying the pilot had stopped at Corona for fuel and had 80 gallons of fuel on board. I saw Facebook chatter about the crash stating an A36 has an 80-gallon capacity and that the airplane was filled at Corona, and this may be where reporters got that figure. However, a B36TC has an 108-gallon fuel capacity, so it’s unknown if the airplane was fully fueled to that level, partially fueled to 80 gallons, perhaps to balance the weight of four passengers, or it the reports of fuel load were wrong. A typical 1983 B36TC with four persons aboard would be near, at or beyond maximum gross weight with 80 gallons on board and likely well over weight if fueled to full capacity for the type, so I expect NTSB investigators will be looking closely at the estimated departure weight and balance information.

The reporter says “a couple of” eyewitness said the airplane was “having trouble getting into the air.” One witness interviewed on camera states the Bonanza would “take off about two or three feet off the ground,” then “go down” [presumably, back onto the runway, and that “he did that three times” before passing a wind sock she said is “
usually the time to shut down” if the airplane is not airborne—that is, the final rejected takeoff point. The witness “did not hear [the pilot] pull back power” and the airplane continued under power into the fence before it “flipped over” and erupted into flames.

I covered rejected takeoffs and the “70/50 Rule” just last week in FLYING LESSONS Weekly.)  

See:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fl6gIqOMNdM&feature=youtu.be&app=desktop and https://www.mastery-flight-training.com/20200116-flying-lessons.pdf

1/22 1727Z (0927 local Wednesday morning): A Be36 struck a bird while on final approach to San Jose, California. The two aboard were unhurt and airplane damage is “minor”. N6108S (E-1946) is a 1982 A36 registered in Santa Clarita, California. 

(“Bird strike on final approach”—AOPA recently stated there are 40 reported bird strikes against aircraft each week in the United States. It publishes these suggestions for dealing with bird strikes and their aftermath.)

See https://www.aopa.org/-/media/files/aopa/home/pilot-resources/safety-and-proficiency/bird-and-wildlife-strikes/sb11.pdf?la=en&hash=8DDBAE75C364B5D5831CF1F283ADF062  

 

New NTSB reports this week

Events previously reported in the Weekly Accident Update

There are no newly posted piston Beech NTSB preliminary reports this period.

 

2020 SUMMARY: Reported Beechcraft piston mishaps, 2020:

Total reported: 7 reports

Environment: 

Operation in VMC: 2 report 
Operation in IMC:    0 reports  
Weather “unknown” or “not reported”:  5 reports
Operation at night: 0 reports    

Most Serious Injury
“Serious” injury accidents (not involving fatalities):  0 reports 
Fatal accidents:  1 report

Aircraft damage
“Substantial” damage:  1 report
Aircraft “destroyed”:   1 report

 

BEECH AERO CLUB Series:  2 reports

By Aircraft Type      

Be23 Musketeer/Sundowner  1 report
Be76 Duchess 1 report

Be19 Sport.
Be24 Custom III/Sierra 
Be77 Skipper

 

Total reported 2020: 2 reports

Environment: 

Operation in VMC:  0 reports 
Operation in IMC:    0 reports  
Weather “unknown” or “not reported”:  2 reports
Operation at night: 0 reports    

Most Serious Injury
“Serious” injury accidents (not involving fatalities):  0 reports 
Fatal accidents:  0 reports

Aircraft damage

“Substantial” damage:  1 report
Aircraft “destroyed”:   0 reports

 

PRELIMINARY DETERMINATION OF CAUSE 

(all subject to update per official findings):

FATAL and SERIOUS INJURY EVENTS   0 reports 

OTHER EVENTS    1 report

Impact during landing 1 report

Loss of directional control during landing  1 report (Be23) 

Miscellaneous/Unknown. 1 report

Loss of directional control on the runway  1 report (Be76)

 

BONANZA/BARON Series:   5 reports

By Aircraft Type      

Be 36  2 reports
Be33 Debonair/Bonanza 1 report
Be55 Baron  1 report
Be95 Travel Air 1 report

Be35 Bonanza
Be56 Turbo Baron
Be58 Baron

Total reported 2020: 5 reports

Environment: 

Operation in VMC:  2 reports 
Operation in IMC:    0 reports  
Weather “unknown” or “not reported”:  3 reports
Operation at night: 0 reports    

Most Serious Injury
“Serious” injury accidents (not involving fatalities):  0 reports 
Fatal accidents:  1 report

Aircraft damage
“Substantial” damage:  0 reports
Aircraft “destroyed”:   1 report

 

PRELIMINARY DETERMINATION OF CAUSE 
(all subject to update per official findings):

FATAL and SERIOUS INJURY EVENTS    1 reports

Impact during takeoff/initial climb  1 report 

Failed to reject takeoff/failed to attain climb/runway overrun 1 report (Be36)


OTHER EVENTS    4 reports

 

Landing gear-related mishaps 3 reports

Gear up landing  1 report (Be33)

Gear collapse during landing. 1 report (Be55)

Partial gear extension—mechanical failure. 1 report (Be95)


Miscellaneous/Unknown  1 report

Bird strike on final approach   1 report (Be36)


MISCELLANEOUS Models:  0 reports

Be17 Staggerwing
Be18 Twin Beech/Expeditor/Kansan
Be45 Mentor/T-34
Be50 Twin Bonanza
Be60 Duke
Be65 Queen Air

 

Total reported 2020: 0 reports

Environment: 

Operation in VMC:  0 reports 
Operation in IMC:    0 reports  
Weather “unknown” or “not reported”:  0 reports
Operation at night: 0 reports    

Most Serious Injury

“Serious” injury accidents (not involving fatalities):  0 reports 
Fatal accidents:  0 reports

Aircraft damage

“Substantial” damage:  0 reports
Aircraft “destroyed”:   0 reports

 

PRELIMINARY DETERMINATION OF CAUSE 

(all subject to update per official findings):

FATAL and SERIOUS INJURY EVENTS   0 reports

OTHER EVENTS   0 reports

 

Recognize an N-number?  Want to check on friends or family that may have been involved in a cited mishap?  Click here to find the registered owner.   Please accept my sincere personal condolences if you or anyone you know was involved in a mishap.  I welcome your comments, suggestions and criticisms.  

 

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