Beech Weekly Accident Update

Piston Beechcraft Accidents 

2/7/2020 – 2/12/2020 

Official information from FAA and NTSB sources (unless otherwise noted). Editorial comments (contained in parentheses), year-to-date summary and closing comments are those of the author.  All information is preliminary and subject to change.  Comments are meant solely to enhance flying safety.  Please use these reports to help you more accurately evaluate the potential risks when you make your own decisions about how and when to fly.  © 2020 Mastery Flight Training, Inc.  All Rights Reserved

THE WEEKLY ACCIDENT UPDATE IS AN INDEPENDENT PRODUCT OF

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New reports this week

28 1915Z (1315 local Saturday afternoon): The solo pilot of a Be33 died and the airplane was apparently “destroyed,” near the Granbury, Texas airport.  N6665U (CE-880) was a 1979 F33A registered in Weatherford, Texas.

(“Crash/unknown”; “Fatal”; “Airplane destroyed”—an industry report quotes a local news account as saying:

At approximately 11:10 a.m. February 9th, Highway Patrol Troopers were called to the wreckage site of a plane crash north of FM 4 and west of CR 2580. When troopers arrived, they found a Beechcraft F33A Bonanza with the sole occupant dead inside. Officials said the accident is suspected to have occurred Saturday because that is when the pilot — who has not been identified — had filed a flight plan from Mineral Wells [Texas] to Granbury.

That same website includes a reader post that refers to an online ADS-B plot:  

It looks like [the pilot] overflew the runway, turned right, flew an extended downwind (not that square so it doesn’t look like a pattern), then turned across the approach path, and then crashed. Caveat: ADS-B data isn’t that reliable down low so just because the track stops that doesn’t mean the aircraft did. 

Hopefully we’ll learn more from the NTSB investigation, but they may not have much information to go on). 

2/8 2250Z (1650 local Saturday afternoon): A Be55 “struck a light on taxi” at Tulsa, Oklahoma. The solo pilot was unhurt and airplane damage is “unknown”. N15A (TE-172) is a 1966 C55 registered in Pryor, Oklahoma. 

(“Collision with object during taxi”)

2/10 2045Z (1245 local Monday afternoon): A Be36 “landed and went off the runway and flipped over,” at Avalon (Catalina Island), California. The two aboard escaped injury despite “substantial” airplane damage. N6056Q (E-1504) is/was a 1979 A36 registered in San Diego, California. 

(“Landed long/runway overrun”; “Substantial damage”—the pilot and passenger were extremely fortunate. Online reports show the airplane was completely inverted on the ground after running off the end of the runway into a ravine. Avalon’s “airport in the sky” is well known as a challenging runway with bluffs on each end that provide unusual visual cues, and sometimes tricky winds. Regardless of the runway’s level of difficulty, if on short final you’re not on speed, in configuration, aligned with the runway centerline and on glide path to be firmly on the ground one-third of the runway length or 1000 feet from the threshold, whichever is less, then don’t wait until you begin your flare to see if it’s going to work…go around before your flare, and decide whether to try it again.)

 

New NTSB reports this week

Events previously reported in the Weekly Accident Update

1/22 quadruple-fatality B36TC failure to reject takeoff/failure to climb at Corona, California. Factors cited in the NTSB preliminary report that are likely relevant:

- Four adults were on board. The aft passengers were seated one in a rear-facing seat and one in a forward-facing seat. Although the passengers may have done this for comfort and space, it is also consistent with balancing the typically nose-heavy turbocharged Bonanzas.

NTSB estimates show the airplane to be near maximum gross weight and at a forward CG, within limits.

The pilot had flown a short distance from Torrance, California to refuel at Corona. 78.06 gallons were added to the airplane’s estimated 7 gallons remaining on board upon landing at Corona.

Takeoff was attempted with an approximately 5-knot tailwind.

There is no evidence of engine trouble prior to impact.

The airplane lifted off three times during the attempted takeoff and settled back to the surface. Each time the airplane entered a “very nose-high attitude.”

The elevator trim tabs were found in the full down position (full nose up trim) and the actuators measured about 2 inches which equated to 27 degrees tab down (maximum travel limit per the FAA type certificate data sheet).

 

2020 SUMMARY: Reported Beechcraft piston mishaps, 2020:

Total reported: 14 reports

Environment: 

Operation in VMC: 5 reports 
Operation in IMC:    0 reports  
Weather “unknown” or “not reported”:  9 reports
Operation at night: 0 reports    

Most Serious Injury
“Serious” injury accidents (not involving fatalities):  1 report 
Fatal accidents:  2 reports

Aircraft damage
“Substantial” damage:  4 reports
Aircraft “destroyed”:   2 reports

 

BEECH AERO CLUB Series:  2 reports

By Aircraft Type      

Be23 Musketeer/Sundowner  1 report
Be76 Duchess 1 report

Be19 Sport.
Be24 Custom III/Sierra 
Be77 Skipper

 

Total reported 2020: 2 reports

Environment: 

Operation in VMC:  0 reports 
Operation in IMC:    0 reports  
Weather “unknown” or “not reported”:  2 reports
Operation at night: 0 reports    

Most Serious Injury
“Serious” injury accidents (not involving fatalities):  0 reports 
Fatal accidents:  0 reports

Aircraft damage

“Substantial” damage:  1 report
Aircraft “destroyed”:   0 reports

 

PRELIMINARY DETERMINATION OF CAUSE 

(all subject to update per official findings):

FATAL and SERIOUS INJURY EVENTS   0 reports 


OTHER EVENTS    1 report

Impact during landing 1 report

Loss of directional control during landing  1 report (Be23) 

Miscellaneous/Unknown. 1 report

Loss of directional control on the runway  1 report (Be76)

 

BONANZA/BARON Series:   13 reports

By Aircraft Type      

Be36  6 reports
Be33 Debonair/Bonanza 3 reports
Be55 Baron  2 reports
Be95 Travel Air 1 report

Be35 Bonanza
Be56 Turbo Baron
Be58 Baron

Total reported 2020: 11 reports

Environment: 

Operation in VMC:  5 reports 
Operation in IMC:    0 reports  
Weather “unknown” or “not reported”:  7 reports
Operation at night: 0 reports    

Most Serious Injury
“Serious” injury accidents (not involving fatalities):  1 report 
Fatal accidents:  2 reports

Aircraft damage
“Substantial” damage:  1 report
Aircraft “destroyed”:   2 reports

 

PRELIMINARY DETERMINATION OF CAUSE 
(all subject to update per official findings):

FATAL and SERIOUS INJURY EVENTS    2 reports

Impact during takeoff/initial climb  1 report 

Failed to reject takeoff/failed to attain climb/runway overrun 1 report (Be36)


Unknown causes  1 report 

Traffic pattern/unknown   1 report (Be33)


OTHER EVENTS    11 reports

Landing gear-related mishaps 4 reports

Gear up landing 
2 reports (both Be33s)

Gear collapse during landing. 1 report (Be55)

Partial gear extension—mechanical failure. 1 report (Be95)


Engine failure  1 report
Engine failure in flight   1 report (Be36)


Impact during takeoff  1 report

Loss of directional control during takeoff  1 report (Be36)


Impact during landing  1 report

Landed long/runway overrun   1 report (Be36)


Miscellaneous/Unknown  1 report

Bird strike on final approach  1 report (Be36)


MISCELLANEOUS Models:  1 report

Be60 Duke

Be17 Staggerwing
Be18 Twin Beech/Expeditor/Kansan
Be45 Mentor/T-34
Be50 Twin Bonanza
Be65 Queen Air

 

Total reported 2020: 1 report

Environment: 

Operation in VMC:  0 reports 
Operation in IMC:    0 reports  
Weather “unknown” or “not reported”:  1 report
Operation at night: 0 reports    

Most Serious Injury

“Serious” injury accidents (not involving fatalities):  1 report 
Fatal accidents:  0 reports

Aircraft damage

“Substantial” damage:  1 report
Aircraft “destroyed”:   0 reports

 

PRELIMINARY DETERMINATION OF CAUSE 

(all subject to update per official findings):

FATAL and SERIOUS INJURY EVENTS   1 report

Engine failure 1 report

Dual engine failure in flight   1 report (Be60)


OTHER EVENTS   0 reports

 

Recognize an N-number?  Want to check on friends or family that may have been involved in a cited mishap?  Click here to find the registered owner.   Please accept my sincere personal condolences if you or anyone you know was involved in a mishap.  I welcome your comments, suggestions and criticisms.  

 

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